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Newsletter No.27

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‘Walking away, ending it all was the hardest thing I have ever done. It was instinct but I knew I had to’ Dawn Farrow, Founder of Dogs & Coffee (in reference to closing her marketing agency whilst at the top of her game)

Don't get us wrong, we truly believe in positive motivation but lately, as the new month rolls in and life doesn't roll forwards, we've seen a lot of toxic motivation; unrealistic goal setting, intense advice about perseverance, and a lot of talk about forcing yourself down your 'path', however rocky it is. 

But Dogs & Coffee want to let you know that sometimes it is okay not to continue down that path. It's okay to take a little pit stop and delay your journey, it's also okay to veer off the path and take a detour, and it's perfectly okay to turn back round and give up on that path altogether. 


While it seems like the world and his wife are shouting from their virtual soapboxes to keep pushing on, keep striving forward, keep reaching for those goals, no matter what it takes, we thought we'd share some times when it's not just to okay to give up, but actually advised!


Half way through a job application 
You’re in the middle of your 5th (or is it 6th) job application of the week and you’re beginning to wonder if you really want this job. It isn’t in an industry you are passionate about and you are not sure it’ll be the right fit. But you have to apply to everything to get a job in this climate, right? Nope. You can close down that browser right away. It’s okay to give up on a job application if you are unsure about whether you would accept if you were offered the role. There is a lot of pressure to get a job at the moment, and we understand a lot of those pressures are financial, but know it is okay to value what you want out of a job too! 

During a health kick
We are deprived of a lot right now, from popping to the pub to hugging our loved ones. So if you no longer fancy depriving yourself of a glass of wine or a whole pack of Maryland cookies, don’t! We know exercise and eating well can boost our mood, but so can cuddling up on the sofa and eating our body weight in cheese. Don’t beat yourself up if you give up on your exercise routine or meal planning this week, month, year (!), just do what feels good for your body.  

When you already have a job
It’s no secret that the job market is a tough one at the moment. However, that does not mean you have to stick at your current job, especially if it is making you unhappy or affecting your mental health. Whether it’s a stressful workload, a difficult relationship with colleagues, or just a sense you want to try that business idea you’ve always dreamt about, leaving a job can be a real positive change and should not be seen as a failure. 

In the middle of a book
Maybe it’s a classic which always gets brought up at dinner parties or it’s the latest bestseller which everyone is raving about. Whatever it is, you can’t help but yawn with every page turn or reread sentences as you’ve lost the plot. Our time is precious, and even though we have more of it on our hands at the moment, during lockdown it’s important to do things that bring you joy. So if that book is more of a pain than a Pulitzer, throw it back on the bookshelf and read something that truly allows you to escape. 

When you’ve been putting on a brave face
During lockdown 1 and 2, you were a ray of positivity. You were the one your friends turned to for a cheer up Facetime and you were the one who always found the silver lining, however big those dark clouds got. But it’s Lockdown 3.0 and the cracks are showing. It’s okay to give up being the strong one. If you are struggling, whether it be from missing your family or from losing your job, ask for support. Reach out to a loved one or a mentor for some reassurance and kind words. And remember, we are always here at Dogs and Coffee with open ears and a shoulder to lean on. 

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